by Matthew Lasar
Ars Technica – 29 July 2009

Looks like urban libraries are getting a bum deal when it comes to applying for broadband infrastructure stimulus grants. The American Library Association wants this fixed.

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by Larra Clark and Denise Davis|
Library Technology Reports – January 2009

This issue examines the current state of library-technology funding, looking at common problems and concerns among librarians who make technological decisions for their facilities throughout the United States.

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This links goes to Chapter One – click Next to view further chapters.

by John Houser
Library Technology Reports – April 2009

In a time where an economic downturn and concerns about climate change are influencing decisions, many libraries are looking for ways to save money and to reduce their impact on the environment. This report provides detailed information about the operating systems, software, and approaches used by three libraries and one academic institution that have implemented open source public workstations. It explains how open source operating systems and applications, when installed on appropriate hardware, can decrease power utilization while providing a reliable and satisfying customer experience. It will help library decision makers who want to find out about alternatives to Microsoft Windows–based PCs running Microsoft Office, not only as a means of  cutting costs or reducing a carbon footprint, but also as a means of providing a better experience for library customers.

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This link goes to Chapter One – click Next to read further chapters.

by Robin Hastings
Library Technology Reports  – May-June 2009

Some information technology managers and administrators are blocking access to social networks like Facebook or MySpace or to social tools like blogs because of fears that their staff will spend too much time updating their profiles and commenting and not enough time working. The purpose of this report is to give library managers the tools they need to encourage collaborative work both within and outside of their organizations and to make the case that social networking tools, when used efficiently by a library, are more of a boon to productivity than a drain on it. In this report, readers will also find hard data and concrete proposals that will save money and time in just about any collaborative effort library staff might decide to undertake. Even if a given library is not presently engaged in collaborative work, the activities that staff members do on a day-to-day basis can be improved by using collaborative platforms like Google Docs, a wiki, or an internal blog to facilitate communication.

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This link goes to Chapter One – click Next to read further chapters.

by Jenny Levine
Library Technology Reports 
– July 2009

2008 may be remembered as the year in which gaming became just like any other service in libraries, with librarians implementing gaming initiatives that look very much like those we already offer for books, movies, music, and computers for as varied an audience as other library services are offered. In this third issue of z devoted to the topic of gaming in libraries, “Gaming in Libraries: Learning Lessons from the Intersections,” we will examine some of the most common themes being noted and shared by librarians and illustrate them with five case studies.

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This link goes to Chapter One – click Next to read further chapters and Appendices.

After one-year on Twitter, a library web master offers five “tweet” strategies to reach out to patrons, promote materials and events, and find new users.

Libraries have always been about books, but what is it about books that you’re there for? Essentially information and/or entertainment. The library does this while functioning as something of a community center. Twitter enables the library to reach people on all those levels and do so much easier, cheaper and more regularly than ever before.

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by Barbara Hoffert
Library Journal – 15 July 2009

Do you remember how you learned a second language? By drilling on conjugations (je parle, tu parles, il/elle parle)? By practicing dialog (“Hola. Me llamo Barbara.)? Whatever method you used, you were probably told at the time that it was the method for learning a second language. For decades, though the recommended method kept changing, linguists tended to argue that there was only one best way to get French or Spanish or Hindi under your belt.

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by Michael Casey & Michael Stephens
Library Journal – 15 July 2009

We think it’s good news that the Rangeview Library District, CO, is experimenting in one of its branches with an alternative to Dewey.

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by Vye Perrone
LIS News – 26 July 2009

Every so often I hear someone remark that they didn’t learn anything in library school; that their real professional learning happened on the job, or worse, that they think that the need for a library qualification is just gate keeping and protectionism. This always causes me some concern because it ignores the important role that library and information science theory plays in the workplace.

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by William H. Wisner
Christian Science Monitor  – 17 July 2009

Focusing so much on their technology actually dumbs them down.

Libraries were once a sacred secular space of silence and reverence – a place where one automatically lowered one’s voice. As a direct heir to the Enlightenment, the establishment of libraries was a testament to the self-evident integrity of mankind, the belief that we all desire to find the truth through knowledge.

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