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by Peter Godwin
ITALICS – eLIT 2006 Special Issue

Internet generation students do not view the Library as the natural place to undertake their learning or research. This generation believes it knows how to search by typing words into Google, and can find our tuition patronizing. These amateur searchers are now using Web 2.0 tools like MySpace to create web content. The trend toward user-driven content will grow with the use of blogging and other Web 2.0 tools. Students can derive educational benefits from use of social networking, blogs, wikis, RSS feeds, tagging, folksonomies, podcasts, instant messaging and mashups. Library staff can take the initiative in acquiring knowledge of these tools, assisting academic staff and working collaboratively to use the new tools with them in the curriculum, particularly with delivery of information literacy. However, the need for guidance on how to use keywords, and more crucially, the ethical use and evaluation of material remains.

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by Josella Chan
inCite – Jan/Feb 2009

The article discusses the association between information literacy (IL) and public libraries. It is noted that IL is an essential skill for lifelong learning. According to the author, public libraries can play a significant role in the promotion of IL and lifelong learning. However, she argued that having no IL framework and guidelines, public libraries will have a hard time to develop IL education program for the communities they serve. Information on he community IL (CIL) is also offered.

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by Jane Harding
APLIS – 1 December 2008

There is a lack of literature about information literacy and the public library, especially compared with that of school and academic libraries. This might suggest that public libraries are not engaged in information literacy efforts. However the literature reveals that, despite myriad challenges, public libraries worldwide are embracing the responsibility and have implemented a wide array of information literacy approaches. They are furthering information literacy in their communities, albeit along a poorly defined and obstacle strewn path. Edited version of a paper first published in the ‘Australian library journal’ August 2008.

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by Jane Harding
Australian Library Journal – 1 August 2008

There has been much talk about libraries, including public libraries, being uniquely positioned to act as key agents for developing the critical skill of information literacy in their communities. Yet there is a notable lack of literature addressing information literacy and the public library, especially when compared to the volume of material on the topic in relation to school and academic libraries, which might suggest that public libraries are not actively engaged in information literacy efforts. In light of this, a literature review was undertaken to discover why public libraries are viewed as such valuable agents in developing information literacy and what efforts, if any, have been undertaken by public libraries. The literature reveals that, despite myriad challenges, public libraries worldwide are embracing this imposed responsibility and have implemented a wide array of information literacy programs. Not only have public libraries talked the talk, they are walking the walk with respect to furthering information literacy in their communities, albeit along a poorly-defined and obstacle-strewn path.

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by Katrina Macdonald
Australian Library Journal – 1 August 2008

This paper introduces the ESL information Literacy Project (ESLILP) at the University of Ballarat. It describes the development, implementation and evaluation of a library orientation course designed in a TAFE context for adult, non-academic students who speak English as a Second Language (ESL). The paper seeks to raise awareness of an apparent lack of research and information literacy programs for adult ESL speakers in a non-academic environment. It also offers a framework for developing information literacy education programs for people with very low levels of literacy. The framework may be of particular use to librarians working in this area with limited backgrounds in ESL teaching or practical resources. The paper concludes by inviting other libraries to trial the ESL Library Skills course.

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by Jennifer Kirton, Lyn Barham and Sean Brady
Australian Library Journal – 1 August 2008

Most research on information literacy has emerged from the academic sector and there is a lack of research undertaken in the workplace. To further expand on this area of study, a survey was undertaken to investigate librarians’ understanding of information literacy and the application of information literacy in government libraries in Australia. Of particular interest is that many government librarians either do not include ‘critical thinking’ skills in their definition of information literacy, or if they do include it, they do not believe that they should have the responsibility for teaching it. This most likely reflects the difference in client base, students compared with adult professionals. There was a high response for instruction for online library services (catalogue, journals, databases and library website). This indicates a recognised need for instruction and the development of courses and support materials in these services.

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by Helen Partridge
Australian Library Journal – 1 August 2008

The article discusses various reports published within the issue, including one on an information literacy (IL) project conducted by Leeds University and Loughborough University, one on Australian government librarians’ understanding of IL, and one IL within the context of work.

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